Posts from the ‘News’ category

Letter from the Editors, Fall 2016, Issue 11

Letter from the Editors

As summer comes to an end and winter fast approaches, the writers and artists featured in this issue take on what it would mean if summer never came again, or if one day, you woke up and everything about the world was different. A dystopia is defined as the dark underside of a utopia, or a world that has become a nightmare. The poems and stories in our Dystopian issue, however, reflect a sweeping definition of this word: from the personal hell of depression to life as a mechanized being once all humans have been swept …

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Letter from the Editors, Issue 10, Summer 2016

tcissue_200x285Dear Readers,

 

If we had to pick a watch-word for this issue, we’d select EXPOSURE. A young artist is ambivalent about becoming the subject of her art; boys find themselves exposed to the leery eye of a stepmother at a swimming pool; girls and boys alike put on bathing suits, exchanging their staid, ordinary lives for the lives of beach dwellers. Our talented writers are mixing it up in this issue, using mixed media such as the incorporation of photographs, and at the same time they’re peeling back the layers from their characters and themselves. We couldn’t be more …

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Letter from the Editors, Fall 2015, Issue 7

IN THE FIRST YEAR AND A HALF SINCE WE BECAME A MAGAZINE, we have published poems, stories, essays and artwork by over 100 different authors, featured written and audio versions of creative work on our blog and run our very first prose contest. Having lived in several different cities, we realize that every city has its ups and downs. Whether it is the weather or the public transit or just the people you spent time with there, each city has its own unique blend of wonderful and gritty, inspiring and burdensome.

For our first contest, we sought stories and essays …

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From the Issue: Unraveling, Arya F. Jenkins

I am wrapping my un-chicken salad to take to work. Jean says, “You’re doing that wrong. Plus you need more pita.” A few minutes later, as I apply lipstick, she tells the mirror, “I just read on Yahoo, lipstick is bad for you.”
 
Jealous of these things because they touch my mouth, she is attempting to reclaim me. A silver pen bought at Tiffany’s last week meant to remind me of her generosity and ownership.

But I am not hers.

She is the one who said to me, “Come out here to live with me. You will never have to …

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Coming Soon: Issue 4

We are just finishing the final proofreading of issue 4, and we’re very excited about the dark, wintry themes populating the pages. Stand by for issue 4’s appearance in just a few days; and be sure to learn more about our fiction and nonfiction contest. We’ve got some intense, thought-provoking, and surprising pieces coming at you this season. Some pieces you’ll want to cozy up with next to the fire, and some pieces will be delightfully unsettling. Which kind of writing do you prefer? We’ll have a little of winter’s cold and its beauty in issue number 4.…

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How Do You Carry the Fire?

Candle light burning 1437374 mToday’s post title comes from Cormac McCarthy. In his incendiary novel The Road, his main character, an unnamed boy, keeps reminding his father that they’re “carrying the fire.” It’s an unexplained refrain with unmistakable spiritual overtones; the idea that they are keeping something of humanity alight within them. This is an old connection that many religions make between human beings and fire. We are the only species to keep and use fire, after all, and so we see it as our sacred duty to maintain it, to keep it alive. The Bible tells us not to keep our light …

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People’s Climate March

Today is my birthday and I have plans to be out of town. Thus I feel guilty that I will not be attending the People’s Climate March, so I make up for it by asking all of you, our readers, to attend if you are able. Consider it a birthday present to me.

This event of historic proportions may be a turning point in the nation’s discussion of climate change. Perhaps politicians will finally acknowledge that there are many people who genuinely care about this issue and want to work to solve it. As a science teacher, I work hard …

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Balancing the Writing Life with “Real” Life

It’s that time of year again – back to school. I have been nervous, barely sleeping, anticipating the new year and the terror of standing in front of a room full of teenagers who I don’t know and who don’t know me. I have to learn names and personalities and set boundaries, all while trying to make my class fun and interesting. Plus there is that learning piece. With all this buzzing around in my head, it is easy to forget about that other part of my life, the part that helps keep me sane. Here are some ways I …

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Issue 3 Launched!

The new fall issue of Two Cities Review is here! Visit our Current Issue page and check it out right this minute, and be sure to spread the word. We’re proud of this stellar collection of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. Here’s a bit from our letter from the editors to whet your appetite:

Letter from the Editors
We are becoming a magazine. From the initial whirlwind of Kickstarter and launching the first issue to the grind and doubt of publishing Issue 2, we felt like we were going through the process of giving life to something totally new. Would we

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Issue 3 On Its Way, and an Exclusive Preview

Issue 3 has been burning up our computer screens this month, readers. It’s full of hot, exciting new poetry and prose that will get you geared up for the new season. We’re finalizing the issue and it will be dropping in the first week of September, so be sure to spread the word. In the meantime, here’s a little preview from one of our authors, the incomparable Brian Fanelli:

Stargazing
Brian Fanelli

Summer nights we pitched a pup tent
in grandma’s yard, pinched our noses
against the stink of skunks,
while we stretched out on the lawn,
gazed at the …

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